Women’s Health

  • Rachel Gilman, MD

    Dr. Rachel Gilman attended Temple University School of Medicine in Philadelphia, PA. She completed her Family Practice residency at Forbes Regional Hospital in Monroeville, PA. After working as a Family Physician, she returned to complete a second residency in Obstetrics and Gynecology at Allegheny General Hospital in Pittsburgh, PA. She is Board Certified in both Family Practice and Obstetrics and Gynecology. Dr. Gilman specializes in total women’s health. Her particular areas of interest include obstetrics, women’s wellness and adolescent gynecology.
  • Richard Booth Jr, MD

    Dr. Richard Booth Jr, MD is an obstetrics & gynecology doctor who practices in Huntington, WV. He is 46 years old and has been practicing for 19 years. Dr. Booth Jr is affiliated with Cabell Huntington Hospital.
  • Safa Osman, MD

    "Specializes in Internal Medicine, infectious diseases, endocrine disease, women's health, aesthetic medicine. Dr. Safa Osman is board certified in Internal Medicine, originally from Sudan; she graduated from Omdurman Islamic University (OIU), School of Medicine and Health Science in 1998. Dr. Osman then completed her residency at New York Medical College, Montefiore Medical center. Additionally, Dr. Osman holds a Master’s degree in Health Administration & Gerontology from the University of Phoenix. She has achieved various awards during her time in medical career. Dr. Osman is married and lives in Purcellville, VA. She is a member of the American College Of Physicians/ACP, Eastern Panhandle Medical Society, New York Medical Society, International Association For Physician In Aesthetic Medicine/ IPAM, and the Sudanese American Medical Association/SAMA. Dr. Osman special interests are in infectious diseases, endocrine diseases, women's health, and aesthetic medicine. In her spare time, Dr. Osman enjoys reading, traveling and biking."
  • Safa Osman, MD

    "Specializes in Internal Medicine, infectious diseases, endocrine disease, women's health, aesthetic medicine. Dr. Safa Osman is board certified in Internal Medicine, originally from Sudan; she graduated from Omdurman Islamic University (OIU), School of Medicine and Health Science in 1998. Dr. Osman then completed her residency at New York Medical College, Montefiore Medical center. Additionally, Dr. Osman holds a Master’s degree in Health Administration & Gerontology from the University of Phoenix. She has achieved various awards during her time in medical career. Dr. Osman is married and lives in Purcellville, VA. She is a member of the American College Of Physicians/ACP, Eastern Panhandle Medical Society, New York Medical Society, International Association For Physician In Aesthetic Medicine/ IPAM, and the Sudanese American Medical Association/SAMA. Dr. Osman special interests are in infectious diseases, endocrine diseases, women's health, and aesthetic medicine. In her spare time, Dr. Osman enjoys reading, traveling and biking."
  • Scott Naegele, MD

    Dr. Scott Naegele, MD is an obstetrics & gynecology doctor who practices in Charleston, WV. He is 53 years old and has been practicing for 27 years. Dr. Naegele is affiliated with CAMC General Hospital.
  • Stephen H. Bush MD, F.A.C.O.G

    Dr. Bush graduated from the West Virginia University School of Medicine in 1982. He works in Charleston, WV and specializes in Obstetrics & Gynecology and Gynecology. Dr. Bush is affiliated with Charleston Area Medical Center Women & Childrens Hospital.
  • Stephen H. Bush MD, F.A.C.O.G

    Dr. Bush graduated from the West Virginia University School of Medicine in 1982. He works in Charleston, WV and specializes in Obstetrics & Gynecology and Gynecology. Dr. Bush is affiliated with Charleston Area Medical Center Women & Childrens Hospital.
  • Tina Cutone, MD

  • Toni Grahm

  • West Virginia Health Right

    WV Health Right was founded in 1982 by a small group of physicians and nurses who recognized the need for a source of ongoing health care for the low-income uninsured in Charleston, WV. Initially, the services were provided mostly to homeless people who utilized the St. John’s Episcopal Church Manna Meal program. Soon the clinic moved to Covenant House, a drop in center that provided a food pantry, clothing, and emergency funds, where it shared space with other services for the homeless. In the beginning, the clinic operated two nights per week and was staffed on a rotating basis by a volunteer group that grew to approximately 12 physicians, 30 nurses, and 15 receptionists. In 1983, the Charleston Area Medical Center offered WV Health Right free use of an old hospital building. Soon the clinic was serving more than 60 patients per night—and demand continued to grow. It became necessary to expand to daytime hours as well as evenings. In May 1989, clinic staff learned that the old hospital would be demolished. Soon the clinic that cared for the homeless would be homeless itself. The community rallied around WV Health Right and helped locate a 4,000 square foot building on Smith Street, near what is now the Capitol Market. Area hospitals, businesses, foundations, and individuals contributed funds to enable WV Health Right to purchase and renovate the building. WV Health Right operated from the Smith Street location for the next 10 years as patient numbers grew from 2,900 to 9,128. By the mid-90s the clinic had outgrown the Smith Street site and again undertook a construction project for a new 14,000 square foot building in Charleston’s East End. In 1999, the clinic moved into a new state-of-the-art facility that was designed and built to be used as a free clinic. In 2001, WV Health Right added a three chair dental operatory on the second floor of the building and began West Virginia’s first free adult dental clinic. In early 2008, WV Health Right expanded its pharmacy and launched WVRx, the first statewide charitable central fill mail order pharmacy designed to provide prescription access to the estimated 400,000 West Virginians who are uninsured or underinsured. In 2015, the clinic also integrated behavioral health services for its patients. In FY 2015, WV Health Right provided primary and specialty medical, dental, vision, behavioral health, pharmaceutical, and health education services to nearly 20,000 patients through the commitment of more than 400 volunteers. WV Health Right is a proud member of the WV Association of Free Clinics and the National Association of Free Clinics.
  • West Virginia Health Right

    WV Health Right was founded in 1982 by a small group of physicians and nurses who recognized the need for a source of ongoing health care for the low-income uninsured in Charleston, WV. Initially, the services were provided mostly to homeless people who utilized the St. John’s Episcopal Church Manna Meal program. Soon the clinic moved to Covenant House, a drop in center that provided a food pantry, clothing, and emergency funds, where it shared space with other services for the homeless. In the beginning, the clinic operated two nights per week and was staffed on a rotating basis by a volunteer group that grew to approximately 12 physicians, 30 nurses, and 15 receptionists. In 1983, the Charleston Area Medical Center offered WV Health Right free use of an old hospital building. Soon the clinic was serving more than 60 patients per night—and demand continued to grow. It became necessary to expand to daytime hours as well as evenings. In May 1989, clinic staff learned that the old hospital would be demolished. Soon the clinic that cared for the homeless would be homeless itself. The community rallied around WV Health Right and helped locate a 4,000 square foot building on Smith Street, near what is now the Capitol Market. Area hospitals, businesses, foundations, and individuals contributed funds to enable WV Health Right to purchase and renovate the building. WV Health Right operated from the Smith Street location for the next 10 years as patient numbers grew from 2,900 to 9,128. By the mid-90s the clinic had outgrown the Smith Street site and again undertook a construction project for a new 14,000 square foot building in Charleston’s East End. In 1999, the clinic moved into a new state-of-the-art facility that was designed and built to be used as a free clinic. In 2001, WV Health Right added a three chair dental operatory on the second floor of the building and began West Virginia’s first free adult dental clinic. In early 2008, WV Health Right expanded its pharmacy and launched WVRx, the first statewide charitable central fill mail order pharmacy designed to provide prescription access to the estimated 400,000 West Virginians who are uninsured or underinsured. In 2015, the clinic also integrated behavioral health services for its patients. In FY 2015, WV Health Right provided primary and specialty medical, dental, vision, behavioral health, pharmaceutical, and health education services to nearly 20,000 patients through the commitment of more than 400 volunteers. WV Health Right is a proud member of the WV Association of Free Clinics and the National Association of Free Clinics. Contact WV Health Right 1520 Washington Street East Charleston, WV 25311 (304) 414-5930 This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. Facebook Our Supporters West Virginia Health Right Inc is a 501 (c ) 3 non-profit organization. WV Website Design and Developmentby DREAM CREATIVE, LLC Privacy Policy Home About Us Clinic Services WV Health Right was founded in 1982 by a small group of physicians and nurses who recognized the need for a source of ongoing health care for the low-income uninsured in Charleston, WV. Initially, the services were provided mostly to homeless people who utilized the St. John’s Episcopal Church Manna Meal program. Soon the clinic moved to Covenant House, a drop in center that provided a food pantry, clothing, and emergency funds, where it shared space with other services for the homeless. In the beginning, the clinic operated two nights per week and was staffed on a rotating basis by a volunteer group that grew to approximately 12 physicians, 30 nurses, and 15 receptionists. In 1983, the Charleston Area Medical Center offered WV Health Right free use of an old hospital building. Soon the clinic was serving more than 60 patients per night—and demand continued to grow. It became necessary to expand to daytime hours as well as evenings. In May 1989, clinic staff learned that the old hospital would be demolished. Soon the clinic that cared for the homeless would be homeless itself. The community rallied around WV Health Right and helped locate a 4,000 square foot building on Smith Street, near what is now the Capitol Market. Area hospitals, businesses, foundations, and individuals contributed funds to enable WV Health Right to purchase and renovate the building. WV Health Right operated from the Smith Street location for the next 10 years as patient numbers grew from 2,900 to 9,128. By the mid-90s the clinic had outgrown the Smith Street site and again undertook a construction project for a new 14,000 square foot building in Charleston’s East End. In 1999, the clinic moved into a new state-of-the-art facility that was designed and built to be used as a free clinic. In 2001, WV Health Right added a three chair dental operatory on the second floor of the building and began West Virginia’s first free adult dental clinic. In early 2008, WV Health Right expanded its pharmacy and launched WVRx, the first statewide charitable central fill mail order pharmacy designed to provide prescription access to the estimated 400,000 West Virginians who are uninsured or underinsured. In 2015, the clinic also integrated behavioral health services for its patients. In FY 2015, WV Health Right provided primary and specialty medical, dental, vision, behavioral health, pharmaceutical, and health education services to nearly 20,000 patients through the commitment of more than 400 volunteers. WV Health Right is a proud member of the WV Association of Free Clinics and the National Association of Free Clinics.
  • West Virginia Health Right

    WV Health Right was founded in 1982 by a small group of physicians and nurses who recognized the need for a source of ongoing health care for the low-income uninsured in Charleston, WV. Initially, the services were provided mostly to homeless people who utilized the St. John’s Episcopal Church Manna Meal program. Soon the clinic moved to Covenant House, a drop in center that provided a food pantry, clothing, and emergency funds, where it shared space with other services for the homeless. In the beginning, the clinic operated two nights per week and was staffed on a rotating basis by a volunteer group that grew to approximately 12 physicians, 30 nurses, and 15 receptionists. In 1983, the Charleston Area Medical Center offered WV Health Right free use of an old hospital building. Soon the clinic was serving more than 60 patients per night—and demand continued to grow. It became necessary to expand to daytime hours as well as evenings. In May 1989, clinic staff learned that the old hospital would be demolished. Soon the clinic that cared for the homeless would be homeless itself. The community rallied around WV Health Right and helped locate a 4,000 square foot building on Smith Street, near what is now the Capitol Market. Area hospitals, businesses, foundations, and individuals contributed funds to enable WV Health Right to purchase and renovate the building. WV Health Right operated from the Smith Street location for the next 10 years as patient numbers grew from 2,900 to 9,128. By the mid-90s the clinic had outgrown the Smith Street site and again undertook a construction project for a new 14,000 square foot building in Charleston’s East End. In 1999, the clinic moved into a new state-of-the-art facility that was designed and built to be used as a free clinic. In 2001, WV Health Right added a three chair dental operatory on the second floor of the building and began West Virginia’s first free adult dental clinic. In early 2008, WV Health Right expanded its pharmacy and launched WVRx, the first statewide charitable central fill mail order pharmacy designed to provide prescription access to the estimated 400,000 West Virginians who are uninsured or underinsured. In 2015, the clinic also integrated behavioral health services for its patients. In FY 2015, WV Health Right provided primary and specialty medical, dental, vision, behavioral health, pharmaceutical, and health education services to nearly 20,000 patients through the commitment of more than 400 volunteers. WV Health Right is a proud member of the WV Association of Free Clinics and the National Association of Free Clinics.
  • West Virginia Health Right

    WV Health Right was founded in 1982 by a small group of physicians and nurses who recognized the need for a source of ongoing health care for the low-income uninsured in Charleston, WV. Initially, the services were provided mostly to homeless people who utilized the St. John’s Episcopal Church Manna Meal program. Soon the clinic moved to Covenant House, a drop in center that provided a food pantry, clothing, and emergency funds, where it shared space with other services for the homeless. In the beginning, the clinic operated two nights per week and was staffed on a rotating basis by a volunteer group that grew to approximately 12 physicians, 30 nurses, and 15 receptionists. In 1983, the Charleston Area Medical Center offered WV Health Right free use of an old hospital building. Soon the clinic was serving more than 60 patients per night—and demand continued to grow. It became necessary to expand to daytime hours as well as evenings. In May 1989, clinic staff learned that the old hospital would be demolished. Soon the clinic that cared for the homeless would be homeless itself. The community rallied around WV Health Right and helped locate a 4,000 square foot building on Smith Street, near what is now the Capitol Market. Area hospitals, businesses, foundations, and individuals contributed funds to enable WV Health Right to purchase and renovate the building. WV Health Right operated from the Smith Street location for the next 10 years as patient numbers grew from 2,900 to 9,128. By the mid-90s the clinic had outgrown the Smith Street site and again undertook a construction project for a new 14,000 square foot building in Charleston’s East End. In 1999, the clinic moved into a new state-of-the-art facility that was designed and built to be used as a free clinic. In 2001, WV Health Right added a three chair dental operatory on the second floor of the building and began West Virginia’s first free adult dental clinic. In early 2008, WV Health Right expanded its pharmacy and launched WVRx, the first statewide charitable central fill mail order pharmacy designed to provide prescription access to the estimated 400,000 West Virginians who are uninsured or underinsured. In 2015, the clinic also integrated behavioral health services for its patients. In FY 2015, WV Health Right provided primary and specialty medical, dental, vision, behavioral health, pharmaceutical, and health education services to nearly 20,000 patients through the commitment of more than 400 volunteers. WV Health Right is a proud member of the WV Association of Free Clinics and the National Association of Free Clinics.
  • William N. Burns, MD

    Dr. Burns graduated from the Vanderbilt University School of Medicine in 1978. He works in Huntington, WV and specializes in Obstetrics & Gynecology and Reproductive Endocrinology.
  • William N. Burns, MD

    Dr. Burns graduated from the Vanderbilt University School of Medicine in 1978. He works in Huntington, WV and specializes in Obstetrics & Gynecology and Reproductive Endocrinology. .
  • WVU Student Health Services

    "We know your health is important during the semester, and you want a doctor’s office that you can trust with your healthcare needs. You’ll be glad to know that WVU Medicine is the provider of medical health services for WVU students. Walk-ins are welcome, but appointments are requested for some services. "

ch logo

Covenant House of West Virginia is dedicated to working for justice by offering direct services for people in need while creating social change through advocacy and education.

Covenant House is dedicated to social justice through our efforts to eradicate hunger, homelessness, and poverty. Our diverse faith, cultural, and belief traditions unite us in reaching out to those in need, irrespective of race, class, gender, religion, creed, sexual orientation, gender identity, age, disability, or national origin.